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  • Professor Lynn Morris receives the Harry Oppenheimer Fellowship Award

    Professor Lynn Morris, CAPRISA Research Associate, received the premier 2016 Harry Oppenheimer Fellowship award presented by the Oppenheimer Memorial Trust at a function held on 2nd June in Johannesburg. The Harry Oppenheimer Fellowship Awards encourage excellence in scholarship and acknowledge cutting-edge, internationally significant work applicable to the advancement of knowledge, teaching, research and development in South Africa.

     

         The monetary value of the award of R1.5million will be used to develop a novel antibody-based approach for the prevention of HIV infection in women says Morris.  She is listed on the Thompsons Reuters 2015 ISI list of the 3000 most highly cited researchers in the world. Morris is a Research Professor in the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Witwatersrand and is the Head of the HIV Virology Laboratory in the Centre for HIV & STIs at the National Institute for Communicable Diseases.

    Photo: At the awards ceremony the 2016 Harry Oppenheimer Fellowships awarded by the Oppenheimer Memorial Trust. From left is Nicky Oppenheimer, Professor Lynn Morris, Professor Wieland Gevers (Chair of the selection panel) and Professor Robert Millar (joint awardee of the Fellowship).

     

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Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa

CAPRISA was created in 2001 and formally established in 2002 under the NIH-funded Comprehensive International Program of Research on AIDS (CIPRA) by five partner institutions; University of KwaZulu-Natal, University of Cape Town, University of Western Cape, National Institute for Communicable Diseases, and Columbia University in New York. CAPRISA is a designated UNAIDS Collaborating Centre for HIV Prevention Research. The main goal of CAPRISA is to undertake globally relevant and locally responsive research that contributes to understanding HIV pathogenesis, prevention and epidemiology as well as the links between tuberculosis and AIDS care.